Archive | October, 2010

November Dollar Books!

20 Oct

It’s that time again…time to talk about November’s dollar book deals. Look at all the great books we’ve got for you in November! Click through for more!
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Adam Rex: Monster Mind Extraordinaire

19 Oct

Adam Rex is definitely a Book Club favorite. You’ve heard his name before—he illustrated Mac Barnett’s Brixton Brothers series, and was kind enough to interview him for our blog. He’s involved with picture books, novels, short stories—he’s everywhere…and we wouldn’t have it any other way. Today, we thought we’d share this hilarious trailer for Frankenstein Takes the Cake:

Can’t get enough Frankenstein? Check out this review of Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich written by Caitlin, our resident Lucky Editor.

October’s Bestsellers

18 Oct

What children’s titles are being read by children across America? Check out these hot titles to see if the kids and students in your life are reading them. Take a look, and then let us know: What are your top reads for October?

Picture Books

1.The Hiccupotamus by Aaron Zenz ($2 in Firefly)
2.Pick a Pumpkin, Mrs. Millie! by Judy Cox ($3 in SeeSaw)
3.Pinkalicious: Tickled Pink by Victoria Kann ($3 in Firefly)
4.The Spooky Wheels on the Bus by J. Elizabeth Mills ($3 in Firefly)
5.Countdown to Thanksgiving by Jodi Huelin ($2 in Firefly)

Transitional Readers and Early Chapter Books

1.Flat Stanley and the Haunted House by Jeff Brown ($3 in SeeSaw and Lucky)
2. Noodles: I’m Sorry! by Hans Wilhelm ($2 in SeeSaw)
3. Phineas and Ferb: Thrill-o-rama! ($4 in Lucky)
4.Amelia Bedelia Talks Turkey by Herman Parish ($3 in SeeSaw)
5. Rainbow Magic: The Fairies’ Birthday Surprise ($3 in SeeSaw)

Chapter Books

1.Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary ($4 in SeeSaw and Arrow)
2. Guardians of Ga’Hoole, Book One: The Capture by Kathryn Lasky ($4 in Lucky and Arrow)
3.Goddess Girls: Athena the Brain by Joan Holub and Suzanne Williams ($3 in Arrow)
4.The Best Halloween Ever by Barbara Robinson ($3 in Arrow)
5.I Survived the Shark Attacks of 1916 by Lauren Tarshis ($3 in Arrow)

Middle Grade

1.Closed for the Season by Mary Downing Hahn ($3 in Arrow)
2.The Kind of Friends We Used to Be by Frances O’Roark Dowell ($3 in Arrow)
3.Z. Rex by Steve Cole ($4 in Arrow)
4.Million-Dollar Throw by Mike Lupica ($5 in TAB)
5.The Stone Child by Dan Poblocki ($4 in Arrow)

Young Adult

1.Slob by Ellen Potter ($4 in TAB)
2. Chronicles of Vladimir Tod: Eleventh Grade Burns by Heather Brewer ($5 in TAB)
3. Chronicles of Vladimir Tod: Twelfth Grade Kills by Heather Brewer ($16 in TAB)
4.Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins ($7 in TAB)
5.To Die For by Christopher Pike ($7 in TAB)

Nonfiction

1.Bats by Lily Wood ($3 in SeeSaw)
2.The Magic School Bus Fixes a Bone by Joanna Cole ($3 in SeeSaw)
3. Extreme 3-D: Piranha and Other Underwater Killers ($4 in Lucky and Wild! Math & Science)
4. Ten True Tales: Battle Heroes: Voices from Afghanistan ($3 in Arrow and TAB)
5. Who Would Win?: Tyrannosaurus Rex vs. Velociraptor by Jerry Pallotta ($2 in Lucky)

Scholastic Book Clubs’ Bestsellers are the most popular books offered across all age groups (PreK–8) each month. The ranking is based on the unit sales of titles available at the time through Scholastic Book Clubs. Books available each month for $1 are not included.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: IT’S ALMOST HERE!

15 Oct

Fall is my favorite season of all. Every year I wait with budding anticipation for the temperature to drop, the leaves to turn their vibrant reds and oranges, and the first Arrow catalog to mail. But, this fall, there’s something that excites me even more than apple picking and Halloween haunting. This fall, Diary of a Wimpy Kid #5: The Ugly Truth hits Book Clubs! It’s so top secret that even I haven’t gotten a sneak peek, and I am DYING to know what happens! But one thing’s for sure: It is guaranteed to be as fun and hilarious as the first four books.

When we last left Greg, he was embarking on a lazy summer vacation that turned out to be anything but. A ruined birthday, a rainy trip to the water park, a campout at The Game Hut, two fish, and one dog later bring Greg to the end of summer and the precipice of adolescence. It is here that we anticipate the release of The Ugly Truth, which promises the memorable characters and silly schoolyard antics that have come to define the series and a new generation of readers. Will Greg and Rowley still be friends? Will Fregley ever get a clue? Will the dreaded cheese touch make its reappearance? There’s only one way to find out…read The Ugly Truth. It’s not available until November 9, 2010, but you can pre-order your copy on Arrow Book Club TODAY! Can’t wait for November 9 to get here? Be sure to check out the Jeff Kinney fan page where you can watch interviews with the Diary of a Wimpy Kid author and also find out what books he recommends while waiting for The Ugly Truth to come out.

As always, happy reading!

This post was brought to you by our very own Arrow Editor, Ann Marie.

Picture the Dead

14 Oct

A few months ago, I was wandering around Book Expo America in New York and as I passed by the Source Books booth, a book cover caught my eye. It was gothic, full of deep reds, blacks, and silvers, and it was called Picture the Dead

…I had to have it. I was actually lucky enough to happen upon the booth just as the line was starting for the author and illustrator signing! Adele Griffin and Lisa Brown were both lovely and hilariously dressed like this:

 

Adele is the one in the moustache. Lisa's in the corset.

 

At the time, I didn’t realize how perfectly their attire tied in with the book. Picture the Dead turned out to be a terrifying and romantic tale—part mystery, part ghost story—set in the Civil War era. Check out what Kristin, our very own TAB/TeenRC Editor, had to say about it:

“A spy sees everyone, but is seen by no one. Remember that, Jennie.”

Jennie Lovell has lost everything: her parents, her twin, her fiancé…even her home. Forced to depend on uncaring relatives, Jennie tries to find a way out of her shattered life. When she meets a spirit photographer who claims to take ghostly pictures of the departed, she is sure he is a charlatan. But when the photographs begin to unveil clues to her fiancé’s death, Jennie finds herself in the middle of a chilling mystery. A haunting tale with amazing illustrations about the dark secrets kept by the living…and the dead.

Want to know more? Watch this clip of Lisa and Adele talking about the genesis of Picture the Dead:

Definitely pick up Picture the Dead on TAB October!

Comics in the Classroom

13 Oct

Call them what you will—comic books, graphic novels, illustrated guides—but these formats are permeating the mainstream. On Monday, we posted a mini picture post from our adventures at New York Comic Con this past weekend, and you guys had plenty to say! The comments covered everything from comic books being just like TV and video games to comic books being a great gateway into reading. Just like any other medium, comics are both these things and many others.

We were lucky enough to attend a lecture given by Scott Westerfeld on Sunday. He spent a few minutes talking about how he decided to write a series of novels (the Leviathan trilogy) with illustrations, and reminded us that, historically, most novels were once illustrated. On the right, you’ll see illustrations from a late 18thcentury edition of Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility. He noted an edition of The War of the Worlds that heralded the illustrator’s name far larger than that of H.G. Wells! Illustrations are beginning to regain the reputation they lost for being just as legitimate as the words themselves.

Comic books aren’t comic books because of their content—they are comic books because of the heavy use of illustrations to denote action that interacts with the text. They can contain any type of story or information: Comic books can be about superheroes or space aliens, but they can also be about history (as with the Maus graphic novels) or science (as with The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook)! For some children, sequential art makes difficult concepts easier to grasp.

Elephant & Piggie, a series of beginning readers by award-winning illustrator Mo Willems, feature common comic-book styles while still using the repetitive text and illustrations classically used in the genre. Compare these illustrations below: On the top, you have Elephant & Piggie and underneath, you have a strip from Scholastic’s own middle-grade graphic novel series, Amulet. Both use sequential art and speech balloons while also containing positive themes that students can relate to…but one is a reader and one is a comic.

Books for older children are also embracing traditional comic-book characteristics. Did you know that Jeff Kinney actually started the ever-successful Diary of a Wimpy Kid as a Web comic? Now the very same series has kids thrilled about reading! It also deals with issues kids face every day: bullying, growing up, friendship—look how excited these kids were to get their copies of the fourth book, Dog Days.

Graphic novels, illustrated guides, comic books—however you want to refer to them—have evolved into an excellent reading tool. Many of them cover complex issues and concepts in an accessible design. Some of you noted that this format has aided students with learning disabilities, others mentioned that these books were a great way to get kids interested in reading. After reading your comments, we decided to put together a list of classroom-appropriate graphic novels that cover a variety of subjects. If you have any suggestions, definitely leave a comment! We’d love to see what books you use!

Ghostopolis | Tab October
Bone | October
Amulet | Teens September
Resistance | Teens September
Maus | Teens September
Diary of a Wimpy Kid | Pre-order #5
Calvin and Hobbes | Fall
Dork Diaries | Arrow October
Popularity Papers | Arrow September
Adventures of Ook and Gluk | Lucky September
Elephant & Piggie Pack | SeeSaw October

Seven Half-Bloods Shall Answer the Call…

12 Oct

Last month, we mentioned how excited we were about the imminent release of the first book in Rick Riordan’s latest series. Well, now it’s finally here! The Heroes of Olympus, Book One: The Lost Hero hits bookstores and Scholastic Book Clubs book boxes. We’ve already read the first two chapters of The Lost Hero, and we can’t wait to get our hands on a freshly printed copy to find out what happens to Piper, Jason, Leo, and the rest of the newly discovered Half-Bloods.

To refresh your memory, what we know so far is that a new generation of demigods from Camp Half-Blood will be called upon to take up a quest:

Seven half-bloods shall answer the call,
To storm or fire the world must fall.
An oath to keep with a final breath,
And foes bear arms to the Doors of Death.

What will happen and who they’ll meet along the way is anybody’s guess—will these heroes quarrel with the gods like Percy did? Will they find out who their godly parents are? WILL PERCY APPEAR IN THIS SERIES? What about the prophecy and the new Oracle, Percy’s friend Rachel Elizabeth?! So many questions left unanswered. I’m looking forward to meeting these new characters, but I’m really hoping that this first book will include some familiar faces from the first New York Times best-selling series!

If you pre-ordered The Heroes of Olympus, Book One: The Lost Hero from Scholastic Book Clubs, you should be receiving it soon! If not, you can still purchase it from the Arrow or TAB October or November catalogs.  Visit our Rick Riordan Fan Page to learn more.