Tag Archives: Arrow

Happy Wimpy Kid Day!

9 Nov

It has finally arrived! The day everyone has been waiting for…when the newest diary of a certain wimpy kid comes in that Scholastic book box and kids can hold the books in their hands and go off and read. These books have made readers out of thousands and thousands of kids and we’re thrilled that we could be a part of that excitement. Scholastic Book Clubs has sent out over 300,000 shipments containing close to 800,000 copies of Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Ugly Truth. We needed 34 truck trailers to ensure that we could ship the books to classrooms across America—and that is just for those who pre-ordered the books. Check out our crew in our warehouse in Jefferson City packing the books! They even had a “packathon” for it.


If you are interested in joining Wimpy Kid mania, you can find the new book, Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Ugly Truth in November’s Arrow! Also, be sure to check out Scholastic’s Jeff Kinney author page which has awesome interviews and more!

Let’s Talk About the Costumes!

1 Nov

We hope you all had a happy Halloween! We got a ton of really great costumes from you all this weekend, but a few really caught our eye. It turns out several of you decided to dress up as some of our favorite November characters!

Of course, you all know that you will have Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Ugly Truth on your doorstep in just a few days…and no one is more excited than this reader!

In case you are among the few who have not pre-ordered this must-read of the season, don’t miss it this month on Arrow!

Our younger readers had to represent, too! As you can see, while Fancy Nancy and Pinkalicious are dancing over the pages of SeeSaw November, they were both out this Halloween as well.

We couldn’t forget our animal friends, of course. Someone took a page out of Jennifer’s book and went as the ever-hungry Mouse from the If You Give a… series.

You can find Mouse and other favorite If You Give a… characters on Firefly November!

Thanks to everyone who sent in a picture! We wish we could have put them all up on Book Talk, but you can still check out the ones on our Facebook page!

Book Trailer Friday! The Lost Hero!

29 Oct

Happy Friday everyone!

It’s time for another exciting installment of Book Trailer Friday! This week’s pick is from Rick Riordan’s new series, The Heroes of Olympus. We’re very excited about this book here in the office and if you haven’t read the book already, what are you waiting for? It’s Percy Jackson times two! Well, why don’t we let Rick tell you about it:


Don’t forget, you can find The Heroes of Olympus, Book One: The Lost Hero in November’s Arrow and TAB catalogs. Can’t get enough Rick Riordan? Be sure to check out his author page here.

A Little Less Muggle, a Little More Wizard

21 Oct

I would be lying a little if I did not say I’m loving these books. I keep imagining my 12-year-old self reading these and they would completely blow my mind. I said this in the last post, but I will say it again: The world that J.K. Rowling has created is just astonishing and continues to be my favorite aspect of these novels.

Now on to The Prisoner of Azkaban and The Goblet of Fire: For me, The Prisoner of Azkaban is my favorite thus far. It’s the first time we meet the Dementors, which, for me, are one of the most interesting creations of Rowling in the whole series. The third book also has one of my favorite teachers thus far, the only Dark Arts professor to not (at least so far) try to kill Harry: Professor Lupin. For me, this book is really when the series begins to take off in the plot and makes it more than just books about wizards and magic. I’m not saying that the first two are not great, but they are a bit lighter and have more of a comedic side to them. The Prisoner of Azkaban really starts to immerse the reader in the issues of the world in which Harry and other wizards live, and that is why it is my favorite so far.

I could go on and on, but I don’t want to (a) ruin it for those other Muggle-less Muggles like me who have yet to read these books and (b) this post could go on forever if I don’t stop myself now. Check out the video below to find out what broom I recently acquired. At this point, I feel that I am becoming a little less Muggle and a little more wizard.


Want to relive the magic with me or read it for the first time like I am? You can find all the Harry Potter books in November’s Holiday Gift catalog.

November Dollar Books!

20 Oct

It’s that time again…time to talk about November’s dollar book deals. Look at all the great books we’ve got for you in November! Click through for more!
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October’s Bestsellers

18 Oct

What children’s titles are being read by children across America? Check out these hot titles to see if the kids and students in your life are reading them. Take a look, and then let us know: What are your top reads for October?

Picture Books

1.The Hiccupotamus by Aaron Zenz ($2 in Firefly)
2.Pick a Pumpkin, Mrs. Millie! by Judy Cox ($3 in SeeSaw)
3.Pinkalicious: Tickled Pink by Victoria Kann ($3 in Firefly)
4.The Spooky Wheels on the Bus by J. Elizabeth Mills ($3 in Firefly)
5.Countdown to Thanksgiving by Jodi Huelin ($2 in Firefly)

Transitional Readers and Early Chapter Books

1.Flat Stanley and the Haunted House by Jeff Brown ($3 in SeeSaw and Lucky)
2. Noodles: I’m Sorry! by Hans Wilhelm ($2 in SeeSaw)
3. Phineas and Ferb: Thrill-o-rama! ($4 in Lucky)
4.Amelia Bedelia Talks Turkey by Herman Parish ($3 in SeeSaw)
5. Rainbow Magic: The Fairies’ Birthday Surprise ($3 in SeeSaw)

Chapter Books

1.Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary ($4 in SeeSaw and Arrow)
2. Guardians of Ga’Hoole, Book One: The Capture by Kathryn Lasky ($4 in Lucky and Arrow)
3.Goddess Girls: Athena the Brain by Joan Holub and Suzanne Williams ($3 in Arrow)
4.The Best Halloween Ever by Barbara Robinson ($3 in Arrow)
5.I Survived the Shark Attacks of 1916 by Lauren Tarshis ($3 in Arrow)

Middle Grade

1.Closed for the Season by Mary Downing Hahn ($3 in Arrow)
2.The Kind of Friends We Used to Be by Frances O’Roark Dowell ($3 in Arrow)
3.Z. Rex by Steve Cole ($4 in Arrow)
4.Million-Dollar Throw by Mike Lupica ($5 in TAB)
5.The Stone Child by Dan Poblocki ($4 in Arrow)

Young Adult

1.Slob by Ellen Potter ($4 in TAB)
2. Chronicles of Vladimir Tod: Eleventh Grade Burns by Heather Brewer ($5 in TAB)
3. Chronicles of Vladimir Tod: Twelfth Grade Kills by Heather Brewer ($16 in TAB)
4.Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins ($7 in TAB)
5.To Die For by Christopher Pike ($7 in TAB)

Nonfiction

1.Bats by Lily Wood ($3 in SeeSaw)
2.The Magic School Bus Fixes a Bone by Joanna Cole ($3 in SeeSaw)
3. Extreme 3-D: Piranha and Other Underwater Killers ($4 in Lucky and Wild! Math & Science)
4. Ten True Tales: Battle Heroes: Voices from Afghanistan ($3 in Arrow and TAB)
5. Who Would Win?: Tyrannosaurus Rex vs. Velociraptor by Jerry Pallotta ($2 in Lucky)

Scholastic Book Clubs’ Bestsellers are the most popular books offered across all age groups (PreK–8) each month. The ranking is based on the unit sales of titles available at the time through Scholastic Book Clubs. Books available each month for $1 are not included.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: IT’S ALMOST HERE!

15 Oct

Fall is my favorite season of all. Every year I wait with budding anticipation for the temperature to drop, the leaves to turn their vibrant reds and oranges, and the first Arrow catalog to mail. But, this fall, there’s something that excites me even more than apple picking and Halloween haunting. This fall, Diary of a Wimpy Kid #5: The Ugly Truth hits Book Clubs! It’s so top secret that even I haven’t gotten a sneak peek, and I am DYING to know what happens! But one thing’s for sure: It is guaranteed to be as fun and hilarious as the first four books.

When we last left Greg, he was embarking on a lazy summer vacation that turned out to be anything but. A ruined birthday, a rainy trip to the water park, a campout at The Game Hut, two fish, and one dog later bring Greg to the end of summer and the precipice of adolescence. It is here that we anticipate the release of The Ugly Truth, which promises the memorable characters and silly schoolyard antics that have come to define the series and a new generation of readers. Will Greg and Rowley still be friends? Will Fregley ever get a clue? Will the dreaded cheese touch make its reappearance? There’s only one way to find out…read The Ugly Truth. It’s not available until November 9, 2010, but you can pre-order your copy on Arrow Book Club TODAY! Can’t wait for November 9 to get here? Be sure to check out the Jeff Kinney fan page where you can watch interviews with the Diary of a Wimpy Kid author and also find out what books he recommends while waiting for The Ugly Truth to come out.

As always, happy reading!

This post was brought to you by our very own Arrow Editor, Ann Marie.

Comics in the Classroom

13 Oct

Call them what you will—comic books, graphic novels, illustrated guides—but these formats are permeating the mainstream. On Monday, we posted a mini picture post from our adventures at New York Comic Con this past weekend, and you guys had plenty to say! The comments covered everything from comic books being just like TV and video games to comic books being a great gateway into reading. Just like any other medium, comics are both these things and many others.

We were lucky enough to attend a lecture given by Scott Westerfeld on Sunday. He spent a few minutes talking about how he decided to write a series of novels (the Leviathan trilogy) with illustrations, and reminded us that, historically, most novels were once illustrated. On the right, you’ll see illustrations from a late 18thcentury edition of Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility. He noted an edition of The War of the Worlds that heralded the illustrator’s name far larger than that of H.G. Wells! Illustrations are beginning to regain the reputation they lost for being just as legitimate as the words themselves.

Comic books aren’t comic books because of their content—they are comic books because of the heavy use of illustrations to denote action that interacts with the text. They can contain any type of story or information: Comic books can be about superheroes or space aliens, but they can also be about history (as with the Maus graphic novels) or science (as with The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook)! For some children, sequential art makes difficult concepts easier to grasp.

Elephant & Piggie, a series of beginning readers by award-winning illustrator Mo Willems, feature common comic-book styles while still using the repetitive text and illustrations classically used in the genre. Compare these illustrations below: On the top, you have Elephant & Piggie and underneath, you have a strip from Scholastic’s own middle-grade graphic novel series, Amulet. Both use sequential art and speech balloons while also containing positive themes that students can relate to…but one is a reader and one is a comic.

Books for older children are also embracing traditional comic-book characteristics. Did you know that Jeff Kinney actually started the ever-successful Diary of a Wimpy Kid as a Web comic? Now the very same series has kids thrilled about reading! It also deals with issues kids face every day: bullying, growing up, friendship—look how excited these kids were to get their copies of the fourth book, Dog Days.

Graphic novels, illustrated guides, comic books—however you want to refer to them—have evolved into an excellent reading tool. Many of them cover complex issues and concepts in an accessible design. Some of you noted that this format has aided students with learning disabilities, others mentioned that these books were a great way to get kids interested in reading. After reading your comments, we decided to put together a list of classroom-appropriate graphic novels that cover a variety of subjects. If you have any suggestions, definitely leave a comment! We’d love to see what books you use!

Ghostopolis | Tab October
Bone | October
Amulet | Teens September
Resistance | Teens September
Maus | Teens September
Diary of a Wimpy Kid | Pre-order #5
Calvin and Hobbes | Fall
Dork Diaries | Arrow October
Popularity Papers | Arrow September
Adventures of Ook and Gluk | Lucky September
Elephant & Piggie Pack | SeeSaw October

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole

24 Sep

The owls of Ga’Hoole have had a pretty exciting fall, with the theatrical release of Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole happening this week. (Today, in fact. Right now. What are you doing here?)

I’ve been asked by the awesome Book Talk staff to talk a little bit about the film, and how it compares to the books. Beware, there might be some *SPOILERS* below. If you want to go see the film now, we’ll wait here patiently.

Back? Cool. Let’s just start.

…….

Legend of the Guardians covers the story of the first three books of the Ga’Hoole series. It’s a lot of ground to cover, but the movie handles it with skill and gallgrot (an owl word meaning nerve). Of course, certain things have to be shortened, changed, or even cut when you are turning a book into a film, but screenwriter John Orloff has done a great job being faithful to the spirit of the books. (And I’m not the only one who thinks so. Watch this YouTube video made by Kathryn Lasky to get her opinion on the film.)

The movie follows Soren, a young owlet who falls out of his family’s nest and is kidnapped by the evil St. Aggie’s—an “orphanage” that turns young owlets into mindless slaves. He manages to escape, however, and then he and his new band of friends seek out the Guardians of Ga’Hoole, a noble group of owl warriors thought only to be legend.

The movie focuses a lot more on Soren’s family, closing in and fleshing out some of these relationships. Kludd, Soren’s dubious older brother, gets a much bigger role in the film, as does his younger sister Eglantine—though she is ostensibly a ball of fluff with eyelashes. In fact, Eglantine steals pretty much every scene she’s in. Her cuteness is hard to resist, and there’s a very fluffy Beanie Baby available of her through Ty Inc.

That’s not to say the movie is all sweetness and down feathers, though. The owls of Ga’Hoole are warriors, and much like the books, there’s a lot of exciting aerial combat and clinking battle claws.

Also like the books, the film might be a better fit for kids about ages eight and up. The fighting can be a little intense (the director is Zack Snyder, after all), and the story might be a bit involved for younger viewers. (I had a toddler sitting in front of me that became very vocal about his shrinking attention span toward the end of the screening.) Still, the graphics are so beautiful and the story so fast-paced and fun, I think Ga’Hoole fans of all ages will really get a kick out of seeing their favorite characters on-screen.

Be sure to check out the first Guardians of Ga’Hoole book, The Capture, on Arrow and Lucky this October!

This post comes to us from a friend in our Trade Editorial department, Zach. He is the expert on all things Guardians of Ga’Hoole!


September’s Bestsellers

21 Sep

What children’s titles are being read by children across America?  Check out these hot titles to see if the kids/students in your life are reading them. Take a look, and then let us know what your top reads are for September.

Picture Books

1. The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn (SeeSaw)
2. If You Give a Pig a Party by Laura Numeroff (SeeSaw)
3. There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves! by Lucille Colandro (SeeSaw)
4. Llama Llama Misses Mama by Anna Dewdney (Firefly)
5. Let It Fall by Maryann Cocca-Leffler (Firefly)

Transitional Readers and Early Chapter Books

 

1. Toy Story 3: The Great Toy Escape (SeeSaw)
2. The Adventures of Ook and Gluk, Kung-Fu Cavemen from the Future by Dav Pilkey (Lucky and Arrow)
3. Pinkalicious: School Rules! by Victoria Kann (SeeSaw)
4. Grow a Reader Collection (SeeSaw)
5. Fancy Nancy: Spectacular Spectacles by Jane O’Connor (SeeSaw)

Chapter Books

 

1. Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary (Lucky and Arrow)
2. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White (Lucky)
3. Mudshark by Gary Paulsen (Arrow)
4. Judy Moody Goes to College by Megan McDonald (Lucky)
5. Stone Fox by John Reynolds Gardiner (Teachers’ Picks)

Middle Grade

 

1. Percy Jackson & the Olympians, Book Five: The Last Olympian by Rick Riordan (Arrow and TAB)
2. The Kane Chronicles, Book One: The Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan (Arrow and TAB)
3. School of Fear by Gitty Daneshvari (Arrow)
4. Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell (Arrow)
5. Runaway Twin by Peg Kehret (Arrow)

Young Adult

 

1. Mockingjay Pack by Suzanne Collins (TAB and Teen Readers’ Club)
2. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (TAB)
3. Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins (TAB)
4. Freak the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick (TAB)
5. Bad Girls Don’t Die by Katie Alender (TAB)

Nonfiction

1. Bad Pets by Allan Zullo (Arrow)
2. Thirty Days Has September: Cool Ways to Remember Stuff (TAB and Teachers’ Picks)
3. Guinness World Records™ 2010 (Lucky, Arrow, and TAB)
4. Top Secret Boy Stuff (Lucky and Arrow)
5. 3-D Thrillers!: Sharks and the World’s Scariest Sea Monsters (Lucky)

Scholastic Book Clubs’ Bestsellers are the most popular books offered across all age groups (PreK–8) each month. The ranking is based on the unit sales of titles available at the time through Scholastic Book Clubs. Books available each month for $1 are not included.